Passover

בַּחֹדֶשׁ הָרִאשׁוֹן, בְּאַרְבָּעָה עָשָׂר לַחֹדֶשׁ–בֵּין הָעַרְבָּיִם:  פֶּסַח, לַיהוָה.”

“In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at dusk, is the LORD’S passover.” (Leviticus 23:5)

” בַּחֹדֶשׁ הָרִאשׁוֹן, בְּאַרְבָּעָה עָשָׂר לַחֹדֶשׁ–בֵּין הָעַרְבָּיִם:  פֶּסַח, לַיהוָה.”

“In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at dusk, is the LORD’S passover.” (Leviticus 23:5)

Passover is probably the best known of the Jewish holidays, mostly because it ties in with Christian history.Passover begins on the 15th day of the Jewish month of Nissan. It is the first of the three major festivals with both historical and agricultural significance (the other two are Shavu’ot and Sukkot).

The name “Passover” refers to the fact that G-d “passed over” the houses of the Jews when he was slaying the firstborn of Egypt. In Hebrew, it is known as Pesach, which is based on the Hebrew root meaning “pass over”.

The Haggadah is a Jewish religious text that sets out the order of the Passover Seder.

Reading the Haggadah is a fulfillment of the scriptural commandment to each Jew to “tell your son” about the Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt.

In Israel, Passover is the seven-day holiday of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, with the first and last days observed as legal holidays and as holy days involving abstention from work, special prayer services, and holiday meals; the intervening days are known as Chol HaMoed(“festival days”).

Credits:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

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