Faculty of Social Sciences

The Faculty of Social Sciences (Hebrew: הפקולטה למדעי החברה) is one the most known and famous faculties in Israel. The faculty was founded in March 1953.
In the 1930’s and 1940’s, the Hebrew University began conducting research on and teaching social topics. In the beginning, these studies grew within departments in the Humanities Faculty, such as Sociology of Israel, Sociology of Religion, Economics, Israeli Society and the Middle East. Later, these and other subjects were organized within the new Department of Social Studies in the Faculty of Humanities.

Following the War of Independence in 1948, there was an urgent need for the rapid development of Social Science Studies. Mass immigration had doubled the population and changed the structure of society. The economy was growing fast and encountering serious difficulties. Under these conditions, there was an increased demand for economists, sociologists, statisticians and civil and business administrators.

The Hebrew University took responsibility for educating its students in these subjects as well as developing scientific and teaching methods in economics, social sciences and administration.

This mission became possible when a group of friends wanted to honor the memory of the late Eliezer Kaplan, first Finance Minister of the State of Israel. Kaplan had made a significant contribution to the Israeli economy and civil administration so creating an institution in his memory to provide for the future of these establishments was a fitting memorial.

In 1953, the institution was established and recognized as a separate faculty, although for many years it continued to maintain special relationships with the Faculty of Humanities. In 1968, the structure of the administration was changed and the Faculty of Social Sciences became an independent faculty.

Credit:
huji.ac.il

About the author

You might also be interested in:

Important Hebrew Phrases To Use In...

By Anthony Freelander

Learn Some Hebrew Slang!

By Anthony Freelander

Join the conversation (No comments yet)

Leave a Reply